History of Botley and Curdridge

History of Botley and Curdridge

        

"A Tale of Two Villages"

First ever book on History of Botley & Curdridge was  launched on 17th November 2007 in the Market Hall.  Copies are available from the Penny Farthing Gallery, Botley Square or direct by post. 

                          

 

For a number of years, Peter and Jan Blogg of the Penny Farthing Gallery in Botley Square have contemplated writing and publishing a book on the history of Botley and Curdridge. Realising the enormity of such a task, Peter approached Dennis Stokes of the Botley and Curdridge Local History Society who agreed to tackle the project. Dennis used archival material from many sources together with numerous old photographs, including many from the glass plates of the unique Kilford collection(*).

The book contains a wealth of history of the two villages and has many interesting tales that add to the rich stories and heritage of the two villages.

Many interesting facts have come to light.  Did you know about the riot in Botley? What about the burning of a car of Botley Square on Bonfire Night in 1931 (Health and Safety and Risk Assessment had not been invented - how did people survive???). A photograph of this event appears in the book. And what about the 1926 plane crash in the garden of "Furzecote" in Upper Curdridge.  Was there ever a brutal murder in Curdridge? These events and many others, unknown to most people, are woven into the History of Botley and Curdridge.

The book, priced at £12.50 plus P&P, is available from the Penny Farthing Gallery. It makes an ideal Christmas gift for family and friends, for both those who know the area and those that are new to this part of the world.  A percentage of the proceeds will be donated to the Botley and Curdridge Local History Society in recognition of their efforts in putting this publication together.

Phone or email us to reserve a copy.

Penny Farthing Gallery,
21 The Square, Botley,
Southampton, SO30 2EA.
Telephone 01489 784185

">">

 

*The Kilford collection was donated to the History Society by Ken Gregory, the nephew of Arthur Kilford.